Bereket Kelile

Mar 30, 2022

Front-load your writing, pitches, and speeches with value and you will sound more compelling, authoritative, and persuasive

In 2004, I got a piece of advice in a gym I still apply to this day.

I was chatting with a guy about why I use the gym on base, jokingly saying that it's free. As he politely laughed off my remark I added that the regular workout schedule keeps me healthy and gives me energy. "See, that's the reason you should've mentioned first. Always start with your best reason."

I understood the lesson right away but in later years I learned it is a timeless truth.

Lead with your best in writing

I used to arrange my points like a combination of punches: jab, jab, knockout. Now, I look at what I write to make sure I have a strong opener. And now that I write for a digital audience, I really try to deliver the goods as soon as possible and cut the fluff.

Lead the pitch with your best argument

This advice is really helpful when you are making a presentation, whether to a client or your colleagues. It's the verbal equivalent of your writing. Leading with your best reasons captures their attention for the rest of the presentation.

Netflix could lead with its best episodes

Apparently, no one at Netflix believes or is even aware of this advice. You have heard the recommendation from a friend with the caveat, "it starts off slow but you really get into it by episode 3." Why can't the first episode be the best part of the season? Ironically, the first few seasons are usually the best and then the 3-season curse kicks in where the show just goes downhill from there.

You'll see the difference it makes when you front-load the value and cut the waste.

Bereket Kelile

I reinvented my career by starting a small business, and I'm not done reinventing. I continue to help others through the fog so they can see clearly.